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Everything you need to know about spaying/neutering your dog

The topic of spaying or neutering your dog has led to multiple debates across the globe. While many people believe that, unless you plan on breeding your dog, spaying is essential, there’s a large majority that supports not spaying your dogs or keeping them “intact”.

‘Intact’ dogs have been the norm, up until the 1970s, when a large number of dog shelters were spaying canines in large numbers. The surgeries are done as they prevent dogs from going into heat and causing problems. Dealing with a single dog in heat can be a handful full, hence many people prefer to get their canine spayed.

Whether or not this practice is good for your pet is still a debate. Spaying and neutering can prevent ovarian and testicular cancer and it also reduces mammary and uterine cancer. Hence, on average the ‘fixed’ dogs live longer and healthier lives.

On the other hand, researchers say that the hormones that are controlled by the organs removed in this process are fundamental in ligament and tendon strength and muscle mass. When those hormones are removed from the body, your canine might not be as robust.

In 2013, a study showed that spayed or neutered dogs reported higher rates of cranial cruciate ligament tears and hip dysplasia among neutered golden retrievers.

Anomalies were also found in German shepherds and other breeds. Hence, such decisions should be talked over to the vets.

However, in the majority of the cases, negative outcomes after spaying/neutering were in dogs who were neutered before reaching sexual maturity.

Many people spay dogs to ‘fix’ their behavioral problems, but studies have shown that this only happens in 20% to 30% of the cases. If you are only getting your dog neutered to ensure that they don’t urinate around the house anymore, then it is better that you first discuss this concern with a professional.

Each dog should be handled case-by-case and not on the basis of common research.

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